A 2018 Year-End Report: The Western Binge

The Westerns Binge - banner image

I think this was my longest theme binge ever. It all started last January with a new Beverly Jenkins release, which reminded me how long it had been since I read Westerns, so I went into the Kindle archives and then bought a bunch of new stuff and now I have approximately 137,000 books in my Westerns collection.

Looking back at dates in Goodreads, this kicked into high gear at the end of May. Which is when Thing1 graduated from high school. Upon reflection, I believe I was establishing the mindset to achieve A Mood in which to visualize The Ex falling off a cliff into a really prickly bush and having to stay there for days in a dust storm because of a nest of rattlesnakes or something. (NOTE: His horse is fine and lingers happily just far enough out of reach to add to the evil humor of the situation.)

ANYWAY.

From January through July, I read more than 40 Western historical romances — a mix of re-reads and new-to-me — and watched a bunch of classic Western movies. It was a grand (and, of course, inherently problematic) adventure.

Saddle up, pardners.

(You knew I was going to say that.)

Beverly Jenkins

Jenkins puts me in a book trance nearly every single time. Her books are filled with not just characters, but communities. The stories and people and historical events are all tied intricately and seamlessly together and how in the bloody hell do authors do this?

I enjoyed the Old West series, but I’m not yet sure how these will rank among all of Jenkin’s wonderful backlist.

Tempest by Beverly Jenkins

I’ve been pondering Tempest for nearly a year now, and I have to be honest — I wasn’t all giddy over the heroine like everyone else seemed to be. Yeah, Regan shot the hero in the first chapter. But increasingly throughout the rest of the book, I found Regan to be — YES, I’M GOING TO SAY IT, GET READY TO HAVE YOUR BLOOMERS IN A BUNCH — unlikeable.

There. I said it. I hid it way down here, but I said it.

Well, not unlikeable, exactly. Maybe…insufferable? Not really that either. Argh.

Regan could do everything. Effortlessly. She cooked. She sewed. She assisted in surgery and milked cows and painted and hunted and fished and rode horses and probably saved the governor from assassination and wrestled grizzly bears as a child. I might be exaggerating about the cow milking.

She was Mary Poppins — practically perfect in every way. And she never changed. The story centered on Regan, but I only remember everyone else revolving around her and having to adapt to her. Regan was never compelled to do any self-reflection or face any self-doubts or show any vulnerability.

I want both halves of a romance couple to suffer and learn and change and grow. Colton did a lot of suffering, and a lot of learning, and a lot of changing. Regan just kept doing…stuff. Her character arc was a flat line, while Colton’s was a scatter graph.

It’s entirely possible that I’m remembering this all wrong, as I read this on audio from the library nearly a year ago. I just remember getting to a point in the story — maybe the fishing? — where I checked out of Regan’s story and switched my emotional focus to the hero instead. Which a very rare thing for me to do. Regan simply didn’t need me to root for her or her HEA.

Now I’m going have to read it again to see if I really am remembering it fairly. I shall report back.

Alexis Harrington

Harrington was one of my first ebook author binges. I bought and read her entire backlist in 2011-2012, and it was great to see how well they hold up.

One thing I realized on the second go-round is how amazing Harrington is at establishing a sense of place. My brain knows exactly what each backwoods cabin looks like, how muddy the streets are, and where the town drunk hides his empty bottles.

And the Western character tropes are all there — the spinster and the drifter blacksmith, the rancher and the duped mail-order bride, the failed prospector and the abandoned mother, the runaway-disguised-as-a-boy and the bounty hunter.

Read them all. Trust me.

Before we move on, let’s take a look at the original cover for Homeward Hearts (Topaz, 1994):

Homeward Hearts by Alexis Harrington

Saddle up indeed.

Lorraine Heath

The binge ended with Lorraine Heath. I couldn’t go on after a certain book set in post-Civil War Texas, which wrecked me for weeks and which I’m still recovering from six months later and which I immediately added to my DIK Holy Fuck All-Time Favorites list. But I’m not going to talk about that one here, because I don’t think it’s really a Western despite the Texas setting, and because it’s going on another Page O’ Lists.

I wasn’t super jazzed about reading Heath. I DNF’d one of her recent Regencies — it was…quite weird and creepy.

To my everlasting pleasure, I learned that Heath’s Westerns aren’t like that. At all. They’re mesmerizing. Back to that “sense of place” thing that I have such a hard time defining. I was there, every time. Nothing kicked me out of the stories, and a few times I may or may not have actually yelled at characters.

The Rogues in Texas books were fast reads — enjoyable romps with Brit aristos hooking up with downtrodden American ladies in need of smug wealthy manly men whether they wanted to admit it or not.

Rogues in Texas trilogy - Italian cover Rogues in Texas trilogy - Italian cover Rogues in Texas trilogy - Italian cover

As you might expect, the American ladies were quite distrustful of the soft-handed, fancy-talkin’, duded-up foreigners. There were some Big Understandings and some Bad Guys and some Jealous Neighbors and I think maybe a barn-burning at one point? Definitely worth a read.

Texas Destiny by Lorraine Heath

The Leigh Brothers aren’t rompish. They’re rough and dusty and remote and fucked up cowboys. All three books were excellent, but the first book, Texas Destiny, blew me away.

A war-scarred, brooding recluse is forced to transport his injured older brother’s mail-order bride to their ginormous spread in the middle of fucking nowhere. It’s a weeks-long journey, she’s a greenhorn, he’s an asshole, there’s storms and bugs and snakes and god know what else and sometimes that “sense of place” thing is a little too visceral, okay?

But, in the absence of any other entertainment, Amelia and Houston wind up talking to each other. And OH MY GOD. The closer they get to the ranch, the more then tension ramps up, and then it goes even higher when she’s successfully delivered to the older brother, and then there’s a little brother who decides to create even more tension and OH MY GOD.

Please read this. And that other one. Trust me.                            .

Genevieve Turner

Summer Chaparra by Genevieve Turner

The Las Morenas series. Just trust me. I haven’t even finished them all because I don’t want it to end. The Farmer Takes a Wife is one of my Perfect Novellas.

Edie Harris

Wild Burn by Edie Harris

I had Wild Burn in the TBR for years. A bounty hunter and an ex-nun schoolmarm, and the author couldn’t have chosen a more apt title. This one burns.

Lacy Williams

Cowboy Pride by Lacy Williams

I binged all of Williams a few years ago, and then all of sudden my library did a Big Library Read for a new one called Cowboy Pride — a Pride & Prejudice retelling. I inhaled it and I need mooooore.

A wagonload of Harlequins

In between all of the above, I read a bunch of Harlequins I had in the TBR and bought a few new ones. By “a few” I mean “several.” And by “several” I mean maybe a dozen or so? Most were from the Love Inspired line.

Kathryn Albright

The Prairie Doctor's Bride by Kathryn Albright The Gunslinger and Heiress

The Prairie Doctor’s Bride was one of the most memorable of the entire binge. The chemistry between the highly educated doctor and the illiterate outcast was unexpected and really moving, and the Bad Guy external conflict was just the right level of creepy suspense.

The Gunslinger and the Heiress stuck with me as well, and seriously, how could I not buy anything with that title? It’s a suspenseful second chance romance set in San Diego and Corona del Mar.

There were also good Albright stories in some anthologies I inhaled, including a runaway mail-order bride.

Carolyn Davidson

A Man for Glory by Carolyn Davidson

A hit and a miss. Redemption was sublime, with a widowed wounded veteran and plain-Jane spinster schoolmarm. A Man for Glory was almost painfully earnest and forced.

Cheryl St. John

Prairie Wife by Cheryl St. John Harvey Girls bundle by Cheryl St. John

Thank you, SuperWendy, for these. Every story was amazing. Prairie Wife is a fantastic marriage-in-trouble story that wrecked me almost as much as that Heath book. And then of course after reading all the Harvey Girls I had to watch the Judy Garland movie for the eight millionth time.

Stacy Henrie

Express Rider's Lady by Stacy Henrie The Outlaw's Secret by Stacy Henrie The Rancher's Temporary Engagement by Stacy Henrie

Henrie impressed me with her debut Lady Outlaw, and now she’s an auto-buy. I especially love The Express Rider’s Lady and The Outlaw’s Secret (Lady Novelist!) and The Rancher’s Temporary Engagement (Lady Pinkerton Agent!).

Sherri Shackelford

Winning the Widow's Heart by Sherri Shackelford A Temporary Family by Sherri Shackelford The Cattleman Meets His Match by Sherri Shackelford

Another auto-buy Love Inspired author. The Prairie Courtships series is particularly great, filled with classic Western themes, like the ranger and the pregnant widow, stalked by Bad Guys though an abandoned town, and a cattle drive with kid cowboys (cowgirls this time!).

The Bridegroom Brothers series

The Preacher's Bride Claim by Laurie Kingery The Horseman's Frontier Family by Karen Kirst The Lawman's Oklahoma Sweetheart by Allie Pleiter

These are set during the Oklahoma land rush, with a marriage of convenience, an enemies to lovers on a disputed land claim, and a skittish widow in need of protection. There’s a running suspense theme through all three books that really ramps up the tension and ends with a very satisfying conclusion.

I recall these are more overtly religious than most books in this line, but they’re also quite violent. Go figure.

More mail-order brides

I just cannot resist this trope — all of these are highly recommended:

Want Ad Wedding by Cheryl St. John The Marshal's Promise by Rhonda Gibson The Courtship of Izzy McCree by Ruth Langan Timeless Romance Collection: Mail Order Brides

And one that needs a bit of special attention: Last Chance Wife by Janette Foreman, who I believe is a debut author. This is set in Deadwood, South Dakota. Yep, that Deadwood. But definitely not that Deadwood. This Deadwood is squeaky-clean and populated by people who never drop F-bombs.

Last Chance Wife by Janette Foreman

The hero is a mine owner in dire financial straits, and the heroine is a six-times-failed (no lie) mail-order bride. She arrives to find out she was duped by a saloon owner, so she goes to work at the mine guy’s mercantile and gradually takes over his life.

But wait — there’s more! They unwittingly carry on a secret lonely-hearts correspondence. You guys. I mean, seriously, just TAKE ALL MY MONEY.

The problematic stuff

Westerns are inherent racist. Period. There can be no argument. And with nearly all the books I read, and like all the others still unread, the biggest problem is erasure.

With the very notable exception of Beverly Jenkins, the Romance West is blindingly white.  I didn’t notice any “oh my god, that’s racist” moments while I read, but I’d only notice glaringly obvious examples.

It’s what missing that’s the problem. Just think of all those glorious stories waiting to be told — and all the ones that will never be told.

The Hating Game by Sally Thorne – aka Fat-Shaming for Fun and Profit

The Hating Game by Sally ThorneHi! It’s me, calling out some problematic shit in the latest squeed-over bestseller!

  • Title: The Hating Game
  • Author: Sally Thorne
  • Published:  August 2016
  • Source: Library
  • Length: 384 pages
  • Tropes: Enemies to Lovers, Lust in the Workplace, Fat-Shaming
  • Quick blurb: Office rivals compete for the same job while flirting and otherwise generally engaging in an HR nightmare of inappropriate workplace behavior.
  • Quick review: If only….(see below)
  • Grade: D

I had this on hold at the library for weeks, and did a little chair-dance at my desk when I got the notification it was waiting for me. I picked it up on my way home yesterday and read the whole thing last night.

It did live up the the hype for truly funny banter and bone-melting romance, so I in no way fault anyone for liking it.

However.

HOWEVER.

*~*sigh*~*

1) Towards the end, the hero describes himself as “socially retarded.”

These are supposedly smart characters. Putting words like “retarded” in their mouths is lazy writing and it’s offensive to many readers.

It’s 2016 for god sake. FIND BETTER WORDS.

ALSO.

This is where I get really cranky.

2) The heroine’s boss – a chain-smoking anorexic – brings in doughnuts or cookies or something and jokes about “bringing on diabetes” in her short, fat colleague.

“Ha ha ha let’s make the pervy boss fat and sweaty and tempt him with cookies so he gets diabetes.”

And it’s even funnier because the hero is ripped and the heroine is a teeny-tiny!

HAHAHAHA NO.

FUCK OFF. Not funny. In any way. Ever.

I mistakenly assumed the offensiveness of this cringe-inducing bullshit was common knowledge as well, but apparently not, so let’s review, shall we?

A) Fat-shaming is not, never has been, and never will be funny.

B) Diabetes is not, never has been, and never will be funny.

C) Openly mocking a character by assigning these traits is GROSS and INSULTING and even lazier writing.

This book might have been one of my favorite reads of the year. But nope. I lost all trust in the author and will probably never read her again.

I sincerely hope she gets a better editor and better beta readers who have the compassion to actually notice this bullshit and the balls to call it out.

Fuck It. I’m Going Full Snark.

In case you missed it, here are the related posts:

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Me to myself yesterday:

There’s a lot of confusion about what exactly does and doesn’t occur in That Book. I think it would be worthwhile to lay out the critical plot points and character backstories.

Today on Twitter:Writing an FAQTwo hours later:

Full SnarkYou’ve been warned.

If you’re looking for smart people saying smart things, go here:

Otherwise, GFTO, I’m going in.

The main characters

Stella Muller/Hadassah Benjamin. Our heroine. She’s Jewish, but had false papers claiming she’s Aryan. It’s easy to believe because thanks to her Dutch grandmother, she has hair the color of gold and eyes as blue as the Judean sky. Hadassah is her Hebrew name and Stella is her Aryan alter ago; this mirrors the holy texts, except the ancient Hadassah becomes Esther when she’s made Queen of Persia. In the book, she’s known as Stella until she proclaims her Jewishness.

Colonel Aric von Schmidt. Our hero. He’s the SS officer newly assigned the command of Theresienstadt. But he’s not really SS – he was invalided out of the Wehrmacht (the field army) after ten years and many battles. He calls his new SS colleagues “mangy curs” and “uniformed thugs” which proves that he’s not a True Nazi. Aric is  Austrian; his father was a baron and a self-described “gentleman farmer.” His name is spelled with an “A” because he’s the modernized version of Ahasuerus, King of Persia. I have no idea how to pronounce “Ahasuerus.” It keeps coming out as “Asuharious.”

Uncle Morty, full name Mordecai Benjamin. He’s Stella’s uncle, but has raised her as a daughter after she was orphaned. Morty is the conscience on Stella’s shoulder, whispering to her to keep the faith.

Captain Hermann. He’s second in command at the camp, a career SS man, and a brutal bully. He’s kinda pissy that he didn’t get promoted to commandant. Hermann = Haman, chief toady to the Persian king and Mordecai’s archenemy.

Hardly any snark! Except for that one bit about the True Nazis. If you can’t handle that, GTFO because there’s more.

Chapters 1-4

Stella wakes up in a strange room and meets Colonel Aric. We learn she was at Dachau, but she was there by mistake and he’s the kind of officer that doesn’t tolerate mistakes made against women with blond hair and blue eyes. Stella has exactly the secretarial skills he needs, because of course she does, so he’s taking her with him to his new post as commandant of Theresienstadt.

“…as easily as I netted you from that cesspool Dachau, I can toss you back.”

Stella’s blond hair is shorn, so as they’re getting in the SS car to head out to Czechoslovakia, Aric reaches into his pocket and pulls out a red wig.

No, really.

For Such a Time - The Red Wig Continue reading

The Insta-Love Annual Sappy Holiday Romance Binge: The Contemporaries

Officemates are playing incredibly crappy Christmas music at full volume, so I feel no guilt whatsoever about writing blog posts at work.

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Don’t Miss; Have Kleenex

Unwrapping Her Perfect Match by Kat Latham

  • Unwrapping Her Perfect Match by Kat LathamTitle: Unwrapping Her Perfect Match
  • Author: Kat Latham
  • Series: London Legends, Book 3.5
  • Genre(s): Contemporary, Holiday
  • Publisher: Self-Published (November 2014)
  • Source: Amazon ($2.99)
  • Length: 119 pages
  • Trope(s): Reluctant Heroine, Gentle Giant, Plot Moppet
  • Quick blurb: Celebrity bachelor auction + rugby injury = sexy times
  • Quick review: I loved the heroine even more than the hero.
  • Grade: A-

I love love love Latham’s entire London Legends rugby series, and everything about this novella absolutely worked for me. And if you haven’t read Mine Under the Mistletoe, read that too. *~*happysigh*~*

Off the Map by Tamara Morgan

  • Off the Map by Tamara MorganTitle: Off the Map
  • Author: Tamara Morgan
  • Series: Winter Rescue, Book 2
  • Genre(s): Contemporary, Holiday
  • Publisher: Self-Published (November 2014)
  • Source: Author
  • Length: 88 pages
  • Trope(s): Reunited, Dogs, Kickass Heroine, Grumpy Hero
  • Quick blurb: Helicopter pilot risks her career to help grumpy ex rescue his rescue dog
  • Quick review: I ♥ Tamara Morgan
  • Grade: B+

You’ll need the kleenex because you’ll be laughing so hard you’ll be crying. Morgan’s In the Clear is still tops on my DIK contemporary list (OMG, that shower scene *swoon* <thud>), and this one is going to be a frequent re-read as well. Also, it’s about dogs.

Hero’s Homecoming by Rebecca Crowley

  • Hero's Homecoming by Rebecca CrowleyTitle: Hero’s Homecoming
  • Author: Rebecca Crowley
  • Genre(s): Contemporary, Holiday
  • Publisher: Carina Press (November 2013)
  • Source: Scribd
  • Length: 88 pages
  • Trope(s): Hurt/Comfort, Snowbound, Reunited, Kinda-Sorta-Big Misunderstanding
  • Quick blurb: Wounded war vet stuck in blizzard with former lover
  • Quick review: Three hankies
  • Grade: B+

At first, I was all, “WHY is she making this all about HER???” But I kept reading and then I cried.

Christmas at Waratah Bay by Marion Lennox

  • Christmas at Waratah Bay by Marion LennoxTitle: Christmas at Waratah Bay
  • Author: Marion Lennox
  • Series: Christmas Around the World
  • Genre(s): Contemporary, Holiday
  • Publisher: Tule Publishing (October 2014)
  • Source: NetGalley
  • Length: 120 pages
  • Trope(s): Enemies to Lovers, Big Misunderstanding, Family Drama
  • Quick blurb: Supermodel clashes with business tycoon when she returns home to visit her dying grandfather
  • Quick review: Ah, the glorious, glorious angst.
  • Grade: B+

I think Marion Lennox is going to be my next Author Binge.

Maybe This Christmas by Sarah Morgan

  • Maybe This Christmas by Sarah MorganTitle: Maybe This Christmas
  • Author: Sarah Morgan
  • Series: O’Neil Brothers, Book 3
  • Genre(s): Contemporary, Holiday
  • Publisher: Harlequin HQN (October 2014)
  • Source: NetGalley
  • Length: 384 pages
  • Trope(s): Friends to Lovers, Angsty Athlete, Kickass Heroine
  • Quick blurb: Smooching in the snow
  • Quick review: Everything I wanted it to be
  • Grade: A-

I wasn’t all that impressed with the first book in this series that everyone else adored, but this one pushed ALL my buttons. The only thing keeping this from an A+ was the over-the-top Evil Ex. Other than that, this has everything I crave in a friends-to-lovers story.

One Night in the Ice Storm by Noelle Adams

  • One Night in the Ice Storm by Noelle AdamsTitle(s): One Night in the Ice Storm
  • Author: Noelle Adams
  • Genre(s): Contemporary, Holiday
  • Publisher: Self-Published (December 2012)
  • Source: Amazon
  • Length: 81 pages
  • Tropes: Snowbound, Brother’s Best Friend
  • Quick blurb: See tropes above
  • Quick review: See tropes above
  • Grade: B+

Snowbound with brother’s best friend = here, take all my money.

The Mistletoe Effect by Melissa Cutler

  • The Mistletoe Effect by Melissa CutlerTitle(s): The Mistletoe Effect
  • Author: Melissa Cutler
  • Genre(s): Contemporary, Holiday
  • Publisher: St. Martin’s (October 2014)
  • Source: NetGalley
  • Length: 200 pages
  • Tropes: Fake Engagement, Crazy Family, Cowboys
  • Quick blurb: Hotel heiress fakes engagement to ranch hand to preserve her family resort’s reputation
  • Quick review: I really can’t believe I actually like this.
  • Grade: B

I prepared myself for another caricature down-home yee-haw festival, but Cutler redeemed the Christmas Cowboy trope with this gleeful farce.

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Not Bad; Worth a Read

  • Snowed In by Sarah Title
    Insta-lust in the grocery store, but it still charmed me. Grade: B- (NetGalley)
  • The Kent Brothers Trilogy by Jaci Burton
    A bit predictable, but I loved the brothers’ banter. Grade: B (Purchased)
  • Snow Angel Cove by RaeAnne ThayneSnow Angel Cove by RaeAnne Thayne
    Pleasantly surprised. Debating whether to read more by Thayne…. Grade: B- (NetGalley)
  • A Yorkshire Christmas by Kate Hewitt
    The Cameron Diaz/Jude Law bits of The Holiday. But with sheep. Grade: B (NetGalley)
  • Christmas with the Laird by Scarlett Wilson
    Coworkers snowbound in derelict castle = take all my money. Grade: B (NetGalley)
  • Christmas in Venice by Joanne Walsh
    Angst-o-rama. Probably won’t read again, but it was a lovely reunion romance. Grade: B- (NetGalley)
  • Wild Holiday Nights anthology by Samantha Hunter, Meg Maguire and Debbi Rawlins
    Everyone should read this for Maguire’s snowbound-with-the-high-school-crush story. Grade: B (NetGalley)
  • A Family for Christmas by Noelle Adams
    Stretched the marriage of convenience trope quite a bit, but Adams still rocks the sexy inspie thing.  Grade: B (Purchased)
  • Unwrapped by Maisey Yates
  • Again a bit predictable, but lots of chemistry. Grade: B-

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Meh; If You Like That Sort of Thing

  • Her Holiday Man by Shannon StaceyHer Holiday Man by Shannon Stacey
    Yeah, yeah, yeah, everyone else loved it. I found it so bland and boring I almost DNF’d it. It has none of the zing and chemistry of Holiday Sparks.  Grade: C- (NetGalley)
  • Christmas Curveball by Shari Mikels
    A snowbound-with-brother’s-best-friend that fizzled quite disappointingly. Grade: C- (Scribd)
  • Trading Christmas by Debbie Macomber
    My first Macomber. It was OK. The second, not so much (see below). Grade: C (Library)
  • Love Finds You in Frost, Minnesota by Judy Baer
    I bought this because I have relatives that live here. I finished it. Grade: C (Purchased)
  • Snowbound Surprise for the Millionaire by Michelle Douglas
    More travelogue than romance, but I liked the heroine. Grade: C (NetGalley)
  • A Mistletoe Christmas anthology by Carla Cassidy, Cathy McDavid, Marin Thomas
    None of these really stood out. I don’t think I even remember any of them after a week.Grade: C- (NetGalley)

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Blech; Don’t Bother

  • The Christmas Violin by Buffy AndrewsMr. Miracle by Debbie Macomber
    Schmaltz to the Nth Degree. D+ (Library)
  • Home in Time for Christmas by Heather Graham
    Loved the premise, but the execution was a complete mish-mash of Way Too Much Going On. DNF (Scribd)
  • The Christmas Violin by Buffy Andrews
    I’m usually a sucker for anything involving musicians, but this crossed that Schmaltz to the Nth Degree threshold too. (Purchased)
  • Just in Time for Christmas by Kim Boykin
    The Sassy Southern trope just does not work for me. DNF (NetGalley)

One-Quote Review: The Sum of All Kisses by Julia Quinn

I’m back. Did you miss me? Don’t answer that.

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The Sum of All Kisses by Julia Quinn

  • Title: The Sum of All Kisses
  • Author: Julia Quinn
  • Series: The Smythe-Smith Quartet, Book 3
  • Genre(s): Historical (Regency)
  • Publisher: Avon, October 2013
  • Source: Purchased
  • Length: 373 pages
  • Trope(s): Enemies to Lovers, Big Misunderstanding, Evil In-Laws, Scarred/Injured for Life
  • Quick blurb: Heroine who holds a grudge is forced into spending time with the man who (according to her) ruined her life.
  • Quick review: This may end my auto-buy relationship with Ms. Quinn.
  • Grade: C-

“I looked out my window,” he choked out. “I looked out my window at half bloody three in the morning, and there you were, gliding across the grass like some sort of erotic specter.”

Rolling along with a B-level grade — totally predictable with all the usual fluff and banter and light angst  — and that lovely first kiss, and then… What the HELL happened? A ridiculously drawn-out Big Reveal sent the whole thing veering off the rails into a bad gothic melodrama like one written by Quinn’s fake-novelist creation Mrs. Gorely. I half-expected death by pigeon. Yeesh.

One-Quote Review: Her Best Worst Mistake by Sarah Mayberry

  • Her Best Worst Mistake by Sarah MayberryTitle: Her Best Worst Mistake
  • Author: Sarah Mayberry
  • Series: N/A (sequel to Hot Island Nights)
  • Genre(s): Contemporary
  • Publisher: Self-Published, May 2012
  • Source: Amazon, $2.99
  • Quick blurb: Smartass heroine and uptight hero – the perfect combination.
  • Grade: A

 “Shut up,” he said, and then he kissed her, because there was no other way of conveying how he felt.

Kids: “Mom, what’s for supper?” Me: ….. Kids: “MOM!” Me: [waves absently towards the kitchen]. Daughter: “She’s reading one of those books again.”